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Travel in Qinghai

Travel in Qinghai



Bayan Har Mountains

 Bayan Har Mountains

The Bayan Har Mountains (bā yán kā lā shān mài 巴颜喀拉山脉) are situated on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in remote Qinghai Province (qīng hǎi shěng 青海省). Reaching altitudes of 5,700 meters, these pristine glacial peaks form the source of China’s mighty Yellow River (huáng hé黄河), known as the “Cradle of Chinese Civilization”. As a name with Mongolian roots, Bayankala means “Mountain of Abundance”. To us, it represents a journey to the source of purity and the epicenter of Chinese curative wisdom.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 11 July 2012 11:18
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Haibei Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

Haibei Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture
Haibei Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture (haǐ běi zàng zú zì zhì zhōu 海北藏族自治州) is an autonomous prefecture of northeastern Qinghai province (qīng hǎi shěng 青海省) in Western China. The prefecture has an area of 39,354 square kilometers (15,195 sq mi) and its seat is Xihai Town (xī hǎi zhèn 西海镇), Haiyan County (hǎi yàn xiàn 海晏县). Its name literally means “north of Qinghai Lake”. The prefecture is subdivided into 4 county-level divisions: Haiyan County, Qilian County (qí lián xiàn 祁连县), Gangca County (gāng chá xiàn 刚察县) and Menyuan Hui Autonomous County (mén yuán huí zúzì zhì xiàn 门源回族自治县).

Last Updated on Wednesday, 11 July 2012 17:20
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Golog Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture

Golog Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture
Golog (or Guoluo) Tibet Autonomous Prefecture (guǒ luò zàng zú zì zhì zhōu 果洛藏族自治州) is located in southeastern Qinghai province, in the Amdo region of Tibet (ān duō zàng qū 安多藏区). The prefecture has an area of 76,312 km² and its capital is Maqên County (mǎ qìn xiàn 玛沁县). Over 90% of the 125,000 people who live in Golog are Tibetan. Most of the people in Golog are nomadic with many of them living in traditional style Tibetan tents. Most of Golog is well above 4000m / 13,120 feet so summers are short and winters are long and cold.

Last Updated on Wednesday, 11 July 2012 15:05
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Dongguan Mosque

 Dongguan Mosque

Situated in the south of the Dongguan Street, the Dongguan Mosque (dōng guān qīng zhēn dà sì 东关清真大寺) is one of the largest mosques in northwest China.  First built in 1379 during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), the mosque enjoys a long history of more than 600 years and still remains the most well preserved ancient building. Architecture of the mosque combines traditional Chinese style and the local features, with grand appearance and delicate, dazzlingly inside ornaments. The mosque has a prayer hall which can hold up to 3,000 people. Now this mosque serves as an educational center and institution of higher learning for Islamism, and also is the leading mosque in Qinghai.

Last Updated on Friday, 06 July 2012 17:37
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Kunlun Mountains

Kunlun Mountains
The Kunlun Mountains
(kūn lún shān 昆仑山) has been known as the Forefather of Mountains in China. The name of the mountain can be found in many Chinese classics, such as The Classics of Mountains and Rivers, Commentary on the Waterways Classics, and Canonization of the Gods (or Gods and Heroes). As legend has it, the goddess of Kunlun is Queen Mother of the West. The adobe of immortals in many ancient books is said to be the Heihai, or the Black Sea (hēi hǎi 黑海) - the source of the Kunlun River (kūn lún hé 昆仑河), 4,300 meters above sea level, with an area of 60 square kilometers. The river region is an ideal home to birds and wild animals, such as wild donkeys, sheep, and brown bears. There are precious murals in Yeniugou (yě niú gōu 野牛沟), or Wild Bull Ditch. Textual research shows that this is where Taoist rites were performed during the late Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368).

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